Come and die the Master calleth come and die

Is that how the song goes? Well at least it rhymes. The original words of the hymn are something like this “Come and dine the Master calleth come and dine…”

Jesus said “Come and die” when he said “If anyone comes after me, he must deny himself, take up his cross and follow me.” When the people originally heard these words, they understood only one implication for the word “cross” used here. They would have understood it to be an invitation to go die with Jesus.

Many enjoyed the benefits of Jesus’ ministry, but only a few became followers.

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, 29 September 2017. 1 Comment on Come and die the Master calleth come and die. Category: Inspiration.

About Alexi George

Alexi is the pastor of Adoor Vineyard and an Associate Professor at Faith Theological Seminary, India. He blogs regularly on Leadership and Life from a biblical perspective.

1 Comment

  1. This is truly the most neglected invitation of Jesus.

    Let me quote the most famous quote of Dietrich Bonhoeffer in context:
    “The cross is laid on every Christian. The first Christ-suffering which every man must experience is the call to abandon the attachments of this world. It is that dying of the old man which is the result of his encounter with Christ. As we embark upon discipleship we surrender ourselves to Christ in union with his death—we give over our lives to death. Thus it begins; the cross is not the terrible end to an otherwise god-fearing and happy life, but it meets us at the beginning of our communion with Christ. When Christ calls a man, he bids him come and die. It may be a death like that of the first disciples who had to leave home and work to follow him, or it may be a death like Luther’s, who had to leave the monastery and go out into the world. But it is the same death every time—death in Jesus Christ, the death of the old man at his call.” (The Cost of Discipleship, 99)

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