Your Problem, My Problem, No Problem

Those in the helping profession commonly fail to realize their own struggles.  They go through life with many unresolved issues.  No one knows except God and maybe their own family members.  They just don’t realize that they are struggling.

There are several reasons for such a situation: 1) Some are intensely focused on their task and that focus keeps them from looking within their own lives.  Their eyes are fixed on resolving the problems of people.  2) Others have a false assumption that in order to help others, they themselves must be problem free.  Thus they develop an inaccurate view of their own struggles.  3) Then there are others who don’t see their own problem as a problem.  They fail to recognize their own brokenness.  Sometimes they see the problem but they don’t think of it as a hinderance to their ministry.  

I am reminded of the words of Larry Crabb: “So its okay to hurt.  More than that its necessary to hurt.  Hurt is evidence of life, at least as long as we live in a fallen world.”  This is the understanding we all must adopt.  Problems are a part of life.  We must embrace them and deal with them appropriately.

But those who continue in such a state eventually end up in a very difficult situation.  Some become bitter after carrying their struggles and the resulting brokenness for such a long time.  They wonder why there was no one to help them, much less God.  Does he not care as well?  Others become withdrawn and isolate themselves from people.  They become quiet and “composed.”  Some even interpret this to be a sign of spiritual maturity.

All along they had the tools and skills to solve their own issues, but they just could not recognize them.  These undetected issues have impacted their ministry and their personal growth.  Jesus himself suffered much during his life here on earth (Hebrews 5:7-8 ESV).  Unfortunately they have directed many people to Jesus, but they themselves could not get there.

Why do you think people fail to recognize their own struggles?

Leave your comments here.


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, 8 November 2012. 3 Comments on Your Problem, My Problem, No Problem. Category: Uncategorized.

About Alexi George

Alexi is the pastor of Adoor Vineyard Church and Associate Professor of Old Testament at Faith Theological Seminary, India. He's earned the B.A. in Christian Ministry from West Coast Christian College, Fresno, CA, the M.Div. in Biblical Languages and Christian Education from Evangel University, Springfield, MO, and the D.Th. in Old Testament from University of South Africa.

3 Comments

  1. Savvy Mom says:

    Pastor, Point no. 2, i believe is perhaps the biggest reason why people fail to recognize their own need for help.
    Also…i think you need a certain amount of humility to admit that you have a problem.

  2. Savvy Mom says:

    Pastor..i think a certain amount of humility is needed to admit that you have a problem…
    but yes, i realize that many people would admit it, if they knew they have a problem in the first place.
    So, self-evaluation can be good. And an honest friend would be helpful.

  3. Alexi George says:

    I like your idea of an honest friend. Along with that, this friend must also be accepting and non-judgmental for one to open up. Otherwise, people will keep their problems to themselves without any hope of resolving their issues. A caring, loving, accepting community is an important key to change.

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